Supporting Self-Regulated Learning in a Flipped Classroom

Moos, D. C., & Bonde, C. (2016). Flipping the Classroom: Embedding Self-Regulated Learning Prompts in Videos. Technology, Knowledge and Learning, 21(2), 225-242.

According to Moos and Bonde (2016), teachers assign watching recorded lectures as homework in flipped classrooms to address the needs of individual students. Students are given the autonomy to pace and sequence their own learning. By having students watch the recorded lectures at home, teachers in a flipped classrooms can conduct collaborative discussions and other learning activities at school. Theoretically, flipped classrooms appear to be a promising approach to enhance learning in schools but results from research on flipped classrooms are mixed. Moreover, there is also a gap in understanding how students learn from recorded lectures - the main form of content delivery - in flipped classrooms.

Moos and Bonde (2016) conducted a study to examine the effect of inserting self-regulated learning (SRL) prompts in videos for a flipped classroom. In the study, undergraduate participants were either assigned to watch a video including SRL prompts or to watch a video excluding SRL prompts. The participants were told to think aloud during the learning task to measure their SRL processes. Results showed that students who monitored their understanding paused the video more often, suggesting a strong positive relationship between pausing the video and monitoring understanding. When comparing the two groups, results showed that students who watched the video including the SRL prompts regulated their learning more than students who watched the video excluding the SRL prompts. The prompts also enhanced instructional efficiency given that students who watched the video including the SRL prompts had greater learning gains but did not differ in mental effort from the students who watched the video excluding the SRL prompts.

Based on the positive findings from the study, the authors recommended adding SRL prompts to recorded lectures to enhance instructional efficiency and support students’ active engagement during learning when watching recorded lectures as homework in a flipped classroom. However, the authors noted that more studies are needed to validate these findings due to the small sample size used in this study. Future studies should also examine the impact of prompting SRL on students with different SRL capacities.

More information
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10758-015-9269-1